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When is the best time to graft fruit trees

When is the best time to graft fruit trees



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When is the best time to graft fruit trees?

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I'm interested in grafting apples to new rootstock to create a dwarf variety. I've found several sources that recommend grafting between a few weeks before the buds have opened to a few weeks after they have begun to open.

Does anybody know how much later in the season is better? I also wonder if apples should be grafting in spring or fall. In my experience grafting apples in the fall will take off the bark from the trees.

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I did not graft when the buds had opened, the buds had not yet opened when I did the grafts. I got a couple of years of grafts after the buds opened.

You probably want to do the grafting just after the buds open. Since you want to put it on a bud that has a lot of water in it. The water could wash the cut away, but the bud could dry out and prevent graft union.

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There's a book out by Erich Florman that I've seen mentioned on the BT.

Florman's book is good, but I wouldn't rely on it to tell you when to graft for timing to avoid cut flowers. Some orchids have petals that open several days or even weeks before they bloom. If you know what you are doing, and if it's for a tree, you could use a small branch cut at some point in February that is completely green, wrapped in plastic, and buried a couple inches underground. It will make sure the buds don't open in February. Grafting after bud break of June dioecious flowering trees is typical. My Anise hyssop also did not open the buds it was placed on. I'd be sure you wrap the tree in plastic and bury the branch a good distance down into the ground, because in hot weather some trees can produce floral buds in the summer. You'll get good leaf growth the next spring.

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My understanding is that you don't want to graft when the buds have begun to open.

On Marigolds and their flowers:

For unknown reasons, the new growth of the corolla seems to flower early (maybe 30 or so), while the old growth of the corolla usually blooms later (about 75 or more). So you want to graft when the buds are about to open and a few days later, so you can ensure both ends get enough time to be opened and get grafted.

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When is the best time to graft fruit trees?

I'm interested in grafting apples to new rootstock to create a dwarf variety. I've found several sources that recommend grafting between a few weeks before the buds have opened to a few weeks after they have begun to open.

Does anybody know how much later in the season is better? I also wonder if apples should be grafting in spring or fall. In my experience grafting apples in the fall will take off the bark from the trees.

Any information would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!

I'd say either should be fine. It's all a matter of how long you want the tree to take to develop.

It depends on how big the tree gets on a perma-root tree. Bigger is better. Of course, it all depends on the amount of light the tree is going to get. If you're in the northernmost parts of the United States or southernmost parts of Canada, you're going to have a hard time growing a tree that is small enough to be dwarf. You'd have to add size to your tree as it matures.

In warmer parts, you might be able to grow a tree that is dwarf but if you're going to want a massive tree, it's best to let the tree be as large as it can be. If you have to compromise, fall grafting works fine if you know your trees aren't too weak to handle the hot weather.

If you plan on doing more than a few trees, get a smaller-sized drill bit and drill through the cambium. Otherwise, I've only done it in cold weather. I did it when the buds were opening in the fall. I'm told it should be OK in summer. But it might work the other way around too.

If you are not concerned with something being too big, or would like to have a lower canopy, you could use fall grafting.

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If you plan on doing more than a few trees, get a smaller-sized drill bit and drill through the cambium. Otherwise, I've only done it in cold weather. I did it when the buds were opening in the fall. I'm told it should be OK in summer. But it might work the other way around too.

I'm currently doing several apple trees on my property, and am trying to decide on the best time to do grafting. If I can get advice on the best time of year to graft, and do you recommend that I use fall grafting or spring grafting for this project? I think it might be better to do fall grafting because it will cause the bark on the trunk